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Kirsten attended this Thursday (14) a Woodshock special screening in New York. She was joined by Kate & Laura Mulleavy and we have some pictures added in our gallery.


Earlier today Kirsten, Kate & Laura Mulleavy visited AOL Build to promote Woodshock. They also paid a visit to SiriusXM studios. You can watch the full interview below, and check some pictures added to our gallery.


Kirsten attended this afternoon in Venice the premiere for Woodshock, pretty in a pink Rodarte gown. Check the first images added in our gallery:


Kirsten attended a photo call for her movie Woodshock at the 2017 Venice Film Festival earlier today (September 4) in Venice, Italy.

She was joined at the event by her co-star Pilou Asbaek and the film’s co-writers and co-directors, sisters Kate and Laura Mulleavy. She wore a Rodarte Resort 2018 figure. Check pictures in our gallery.


For more than two decades, the ever-beguiling Dunst has moved effortlessly between the art house and the multiplex. This month, she gives psychological horror a spin.
by Molly Lambert to Nylon Magazine

“In a dark Mexican restaurant in the Valley…” is how Kirsten Dunst predicts I will start this profile of her. So here we are, in a dark Mexican restaurant in the Valley, eating chips and salsa under a chandelier shaped like a cactus. It’s one of her regular haunts, the kind of homey, low-lit, AC-heavy place that’s perfect to escape into on a white-hot, 90-degree Los Angeles day like today.

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I have updated the gallery with two new photoshoots Kirsten took alongside Sofia Coppola when promoting The Beguiled, one for Variety and other for LA Times.


Who else but Kirsten Dunst could star in the Rodarte sisters’ trippy first film?
By Amy Larocca for NY Mag

Three great friends — the actress Kirsten Dunst and Laura and Kate Mulleavy, the fashion-designing wonder siblings behind the craft-meets-high-fashion line Rodarte — are sitting in a booth at Smoke House, an old-school Hollywood place with red leather booths and headshots on the wall just across from the Warner Bros. lot in the valley. They are discussing Woodshock, a dreamy, trippy feature film — a meditation on grief, destruction, and psychedelic drugs — that will be released September 22. The movie was written and directed by the Mulleavys; Dunst served as an executive producer and the film’s star.

“We went on a trip to Florence together in about 2011,” Laura says. The sisters had already drafted a short version of a script, “and we drank so much limoncello and we started talking about it.”

“We’re all so emotionally interconnected,” Kate explains.

“I was the first actress to wear their clothes,” says Dunst. “It was while I was doing press for Spider-Man, and it was this black dress with chains that it turns out were sewn by their mother, and they sent me a box of trinkets — we were all just so excited.”

“Artistically, I think you just meet someone you’re supposed to work with,” Kate says. Both sisters are big talkers: articulate in describing their intentions and their art. Dunst is a bit more reserved. “Laura and I are a very internal network, so for me, writing a script, we didn’t talk to anyone about it,” says Kate. “So for us to sit down with Kirsten and say, ‘Let’s get through a really early state of something,’ that was a big deal.”

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During the weekend, Sofia Coppola penned a long article on Indiewire to explain her point of view on making The Beguiled without including any African-American characters. She has been facing some backlash for not including the character Mattie, who is featured in Thomas Cullinan’s book and Don Siegel‘s 1971 movie.

Here’s an excerpt of what she had to say:

I wanted to tell the story of the isolation of these women, cut off from the world and in denial of a changing world. I also focused on how they deal with repression and desire when a man comes in to their abandoned world, and how this situation affects each of them, being at different stages of their life and development. I thought there were universal themes, about desire and male and female power dynamics that could relate to all women. The circumstances in which the women in my story find themselves are historically accurate—and not a distortion of history, as some have claimed.

Throughout the film, we see students and teachers trying to hold on to their crumbling way of life. Eventually, they even lock themselves up and sever all ties to the outside world in order to perpetuate a reality that has only become a fantasy. My intentions in choosing to make a film in this world were not to celebrate a way of life whose time was over, but rather to explore the high cost of denial and repression.

In his 1966 novel, Thomas Cullinan made the choice to include a slave, Mattie, as a side-character. He wrote in his idea of Mattie’s voice, and she is the only one who doesn’t speak proper English—her voice is not even grammatically transcribed.

I did not want to perpetuate an objectionable stereotype where facts and history supported my choice of setting the story of these white women in complete isolation, after the slaves had escaped. Moreover, I felt that to treat slavery as a side-plot would be insulting.

There are many examples of how slaves have been appropriated and “given a voice” by white artists. Rather than an act of denial, my decision of not including Mattie in the film comes from respect.


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