your online source on everything kiki

Earlier today, Kirsten visited The Talk in another round for her Fargo promotional tour. Check the video below:


Last night Kiki was guest on James Corden’s Late Late Night, and I have now screen captures added in our gallery. Check also some excerpts videos from her interview.

Continue Reading


Last Monday Kirsten visited Jimmy Kimmel Live, as part of the “Fargo” promotion. I have added in our gallery promotional images, screen captures and arrivals photos. Also you can check some videos of her interview below.

Continue Reading


Check the interview Kirsten, Eliza, Jesse and Gabrielle did to Today Show, that aired yesterday.


You know the mighty mighty Toros like you know your own high school fight song — They’re sexy! They’re cute! They’re popular to boot! — and maybe even better, considering how often the original movie still airs on basic cable 15 years after its release.

But once upon a time, Bring It On was just a low-budget teen comedy with an uninspired working title (Cheer Fever), a largely unproven cast (Eliza Dushku, Jesse Bradford, Gabrielle Union), and a whole lot of jokes about spanky pants. EW recently reunited the film’s stars — including Dushku, Bradford, Union and Kirsten Dunst, the only cast member, Union recalls wryly, who didn’t expect to be “back in the unemployment line” after shooting wrapped — to reminisce about the pom poms, the off-set parties, and the time they may or may not have gotten arrested in Mexico.

Continue Reading


Kirsten did an interview to The Guardian, that was published today.

She is about to appear on the small screen in the second series of Channel 4’s highly lauded Fargo, loosely based on the 1996 Coen Brothers film of the same name. Dunst’s character, Peggy, is a frustrated 70s small-town wife who dreams of being a celebrity hairdresser. The first series, which starred Martin Freeman and Billy Bob Thornton, scooped three Emmys and two Golden Globes.

“Doing a television show is much, much harder work than film, because you’re doing 10 pages a day. You don’t get that many takes,” she says. “And my character does not stop talking.”

She says her technique for learning lines is “doing it a bunch of times the night before, right before bed… and then you sleep and it’s like: ‘Oh my God, it’s all in my brain.’ It’s amazing!”

Dunst believes a lot of the most interesting work now comes from television rather than film. “People don’t go to the cinema unless it’s an event any more,” she says, picking at the edges of her chicken salad. “So the movie industry is in a weird place, for sure, and the creative people are blossoming on television.”

Why is that? “There are just too many movies being made, I think. So many of them get lost. Too many cooks in the kitchen – the studio’s editing it, the producers are editing it, the director’s editing, too. But everyone has their hand in it, so whose movie is it at the end of the day?” The result, Dunst says, is too much “homogenised” fare, where creativity is suffocated by money.

“People don’t need all the money they’re using. That’s the other thing: when you have too much time, too much money, the creative starts to slip away. It just does.”

You can read the entire interview at The Guardian website.


Last Tuesday (23) Kirsten was guest at Conan show, to promote “The Two Faces of January”. Watch the interview below, and check screencaptures in our gallery:


Kirsten is on cover of Flaunt, with a beautiful shoot by Jason Hetherington and styled by Leith Clark. She tweeted the photo cover a few days ago and now you can get your own issue. Scans will be up asap.

Kirsten Dunst is so alarmingly unassuming that, at first, I don’t even notice her standing beside me in a fuzzy pink sweater and blue jeans. She is, perhaps, the kind of performer who can easily swing from red carpet premiere all the way down to our current location: an emptied rave maze in Stoke Newington, with its box office-style marquee that often reads something to the effect of “Nelly’s Dirty 30.”

I lead to the second floor—she’s soon laughing off the spilled coffee I put down my leg negotiating the stairs—in search of a spot to settle for our interview. We lean about the deserted, stripped-down rooms, each space dressed with an orderly disarray of paraphernalia; electric blue glitter-paint Monkey bikes idle beside salvaged mannequins, and, all around, monumental lighting fixtures moor to the bare floors, readied for the shoot later.

Finally we’re colluding around a table on this East London roof terrace talking Dunst’s latest picture, until the uncharacteristic morning heat pushes us into an adjacent—though no less spartanly—lounge.

Read the rest of the interview


Page 3 of 1212345...Last »