Fargo Interviews

Kirsten did an interview to The Guardian, that was published today.

She is about to appear on the small screen in the second series of Channel 4’s highly lauded Fargo, loosely based on the 1996 Coen Brothers film of the same name. Dunst’s character, Peggy, is a frustrated 70s small-town wife who dreams of being a celebrity hairdresser. The first series, which starred Martin Freeman and Billy Bob Thornton, scooped three Emmys and two Golden Globes.

“Doing a television show is much, much harder work than film, because you’re doing 10 pages a day. You don’t get that many takes,” she says. “And my character does not stop talking.”

She says her technique for learning lines is “doing it a bunch of times the night before, right before bed… and then you sleep and it’s like: ‘Oh my God, it’s all in my brain.’ It’s amazing!”

Dunst believes a lot of the most interesting work now comes from television rather than film. “People don’t go to the cinema unless it’s an event any more,” she says, picking at the edges of her chicken salad. “So the movie industry is in a weird place, for sure, and the creative people are blossoming on television.”

Why is that? “There are just too many movies being made, I think. So many of them get lost. Too many cooks in the kitchen – the studio’s editing it, the producers are editing it, the director’s editing, too. But everyone has their hand in it, so whose movie is it at the end of the day?” The result, Dunst says, is too much “homogenised” fare, where creativity is suffocated by money.

“People don’t need all the money they’re using. That’s the other thing: when you have too much time, too much money, the creative starts to slip away. It just does.”

You can read the entire interview at The Guardian website.

Gallery Interviews Videos

Last Tuesday (23) Kirsten was guest at Conan show, to promote “The Two Faces of January”. Watch the interview below, and check screencaptures in our gallery:

Interviews Magazines Photoshoots

Kirsten is on cover of Flaunt, with a beautiful shoot by Jason Hetherington and styled by Leith Clark. She tweeted the photo cover a few days ago and now you can get your own issue. Scans will be up asap.

Kirsten Dunst is so alarmingly unassuming that, at first, I don’t even notice her standing beside me in a fuzzy pink sweater and blue jeans. She is, perhaps, the kind of performer who can easily swing from red carpet premiere all the way down to our current location: an emptied rave maze in Stoke Newington, with its box office-style marquee that often reads something to the effect of “Nelly’s Dirty 30.”

I lead to the second floor—she’s soon laughing off the spilled coffee I put down my leg negotiating the stairs—in search of a spot to settle for our interview. We lean about the deserted, stripped-down rooms, each space dressed with an orderly disarray of paraphernalia; electric blue glitter-paint Monkey bikes idle beside salvaged mannequins, and, all around, monumental lighting fixtures moor to the bare floors, readied for the shoot later.

Finally we’re colluding around a table on this East London roof terrace talking Dunst’s latest picture, until the uncharacteristic morning heat pushes us into an adjacent—though no less spartanly—lounge.

Read the rest of the interview

Interviews Videos

Kirsten was a guest on the last episode of The Grahan Norton Show, and its available for watching on BBC. Also, you can watch it below:

Interviews Magazines Photoshoots

In the new issue of W, guest editor Sofia Coppola interviews her “first leading lady and favourite California blonde” Kirsten Dunst. Among the topics that the two discuss: how to not get taken advantage of by directors, alternative career paths, favourite and least favourite past experiences, and nudity.

Asked if she has ever been “pounced on” by a director, Dunst replied, “No, I don’t give off that vibe. I think that you court that stuff, and to me it’s crossing a boundary that would hinder the trust in your working relationship.”

When the conversation shifted to dream jobs other than acting, Dunst said that she wouldn’t mind being an interior designer: “I love interior design—maybe I’d do that, but if I did an interior, I’d want to live in it. I would stick to a creative job.”

Regarding the least favourite period of her life, Dunst said, “Hardest age was 27; I had to figure out how to navigate differently through life.” But whatever difficulties Dunst went through back then seem to have passed. “My favourite age is now. I love my friendships, and I know I have fun things to look forward to.”

Asked if she finds doing nude scenes in films scary, Dunst said, “I don’t mind it if it feels appropriate for the film, but it’s never not nerve-racking.”

For the full interview, click here.

Bachelorette Career Interviews

Here is another interview Kirsten gave to the Australian press to promote Bachelorette a month or so ago:

Crashing the bridal party
The Age 20/10/2012

“I’M ONE piece of a puzzle,” Kirsten Dunst says. She’s not being modest or enigmatic  just matter-of-fact about the way filmmaking works. She is speaking from Greece, where she is in the midst of filming The Two Faces of January, an adaptation of a Patricia Highsmith thriller. Searching for a word, she apologises that her “brain is at half-mast” but she’s quick, thoughtful and relaxed.

Dunst, 30, has made more than 40 movies, moving seamlessly from child performer to teen movie star to romantic-comedy lead to an actor with apparently effortless clarity. Her first movie appearance was an uncredited role, at the age of six, in Woody Allen’s segment of New York Stories; she was Tom Hanks’ daughter in The Bonfire of the Vanities; and Amy in Gillian Armstrong’s Little Women.

In Interview with the Vampire, at 14, she seemed simultaneously youthful and ageless as a spookily precocious member of the undead, opposite Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise. She has made films that have been box-office hits and critical favourites, such as the cheerleader movie Bring It On and the smart and soulful superhero movie Spider-Man (she has called Spider-Man an “independently minded blockbuster”).

There’s a lightness and a transparency but also an earthiness to her performances, whether she’s the love interest in Spider-Man or the office assistant in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, or the dream girl at the centre of Sofia Coppola’s exquisite The Virgin Suicides.

Interviews Magazines Personal

Kirsten Dunst found turning 30 “stressful”.

The actress admitted that the milestone birthday freaked her out initially, but added she has since managed to relax and feels as young as ever.

The Bachelorette star also revealed that while she would like to have her own family, she doesn’t see a husband and children in her immediate future.

“Turning 30 was stressful, but I’ve stopped thinking about it and now I feel exactly how I did at 29. I would like to have kids and get married – one day,” she told German magazine TV Spielfilm.

Kirsten also spoke about the issue of jealousy in female friendships.

In Bachelorette, the star plays a bridesmaid who is annoyed that the girl she used to mock in high school is getting married before her.

The blonde beauty insisted that she isn’t as mean-spirited as her character.

“I think it depends on how happy you are within yourself, what you’ve been through. I, for one, was very happy when my best friend got engaged,” she said.

Bachelorette Career Interviews Other

Kirsten Dunst is happy to be bridesmaid

KIRSTEN Dunst isn’t feeling any pressure to get hitched after spending her summer going to weddings.

“I was a bridesmaid, a maid of honour, went to another wedding … This was definitely a heavy wedding year for me.”

As her school friends walked one-by-one down the aisle, the 30-year-old claims to have felt no pressure to get her own marital act together.

“Not at all, no. All in the time that it should come,” Dunst says.

“I’m not worried. When you do worry, when you fixate on those things, that’s when it doesn’t happen. Like when you hear about couples who adopt a child and then they get pregnant, you know? That kind of psychology.

“When you’re not thinking about it, that’s when it comes your way.”

So Dunst is happy to remain a bridesmaid – for now, at least – even in her new movie, “Bachelorette”.

Riding a post-Bridesmaids appetite for female-led comedies, “Bachelorette” is an indie production focused on three emotionally-stunted women (Dunst, Lizzy Caplan and Isla Fisher) who go off the deep end when the fourth wheel of their old high-school gang – Becky, the one they called “Pig Face” (Rebel Wilson) – is the first to get married.

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