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Kirsten did an interview to The Guardian, that was published today.

She is about to appear on the small screen in the second series of Channel 4’s highly lauded Fargo, loosely based on the 1996 Coen Brothers film of the same name. Dunst’s character, Peggy, is a frustrated 70s small-town wife who dreams of being a celebrity hairdresser. The first series, which starred Martin Freeman and Billy Bob Thornton, scooped three Emmys and two Golden Globes.

“Doing a television show is much, much harder work than film, because you’re doing 10 pages a day. You don’t get that many takes,” she says. “And my character does not stop talking.”

She says her technique for learning lines is “doing it a bunch of times the night before, right before bed… and then you sleep and it’s like: ‘Oh my God, it’s all in my brain.’ It’s amazing!”

Dunst believes a lot of the most interesting work now comes from television rather than film. “People don’t go to the cinema unless it’s an event any more,” she says, picking at the edges of her chicken salad. “So the movie industry is in a weird place, for sure, and the creative people are blossoming on television.”

Why is that? “There are just too many movies being made, I think. So many of them get lost. Too many cooks in the kitchen – the studio’s editing it, the producers are editing it, the director’s editing, too. But everyone has their hand in it, so whose movie is it at the end of the day?” The result, Dunst says, is too much “homogenised” fare, where creativity is suffocated by money.

“People don’t need all the money they’re using. That’s the other thing: when you have too much time, too much money, the creative starts to slip away. It just does.”

You can read the entire interview at The Guardian website.

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